Home > DirecTV, DVD, MediaShare, MPEG 2, Ripping, Video Conversion > DirecTV MediaShare Video Settings

DirecTV MediaShare Video Settings


If you are using DirecTV’s MediaShare to view videos from your PC on your DirecTV receiver, you may find the following information useful.

In order to use MediaShare, you must have your receiver connected to your home network with wired ethernet or a wireless ethernet adapter.  You must also share some of your folders on your PC so that they are visible to MediaShare over your LAN.  Please see DirecTV for more information and instructions, as they are too lengthy to post here.

After you sort out any networking issues, you should be able to see your PC when you press your DirecTV remote’s Menu button, and select the Photos and Videos option from the menu.  You can then see your PC and drill into the options to play your MP3s, view photos or watch videos.

And now the reason for this post….watching videos in MediaShare. My thought was to rip a DVD to my hard drive on the PC, and just watch it in full quality from there instead of loading the physical DVD into the DVD player.  Talk about stupid, I know, but I wanted to try it.

Videos to play back in MediaShare can only be in one format:  MPEG2.  That’s it.  Nothing else.  In addition, you have to remain below a certain threshold of video quality or else the video cannot be played.  I DO NOT know what that threshold is, but here are some settings that I used that worked with some testing.

Audio:  192Kbps

Audio Sample:  48000

Audio Format: MP2  — This is KEY!  Any other format will result in NO SOUND in the finished file’s playback!!

Video Quality – 1800 — is pretty good, not like the DVD source though.  1000 was rough.  I didn’t try higher than 1800

Video Frame Rate – 29.97.  I used this because it was a default in my converter

Video Format – MPEG2 – This is KEY!

I don’t have enough time to see what the upper quality limit is, and the error message in DirecTV only says that the quality level exceeds something, so I can’t offer much help on that error.  But that error message is what prompted me to at least document what worked so far and hopefully I’ve helped more than just me out with this post.

If you can help out, please post!

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  1. 2012/11/25 at 10:23 pm | #1

    I was wondering what program would you recommend to convert mp4 files into mediashare-compliant files?

    • 2013/06/10 at 8:44 am | #2

      I have been using Freemake to transcode for about a year now, and it meets all of my needs. And it’s free. Download it and give it a try to see if it works for you.

  2. SomebodySysop
    2013/06/09 at 10:00 am | #3

    Another solution is to install a media server on the PC that holds the videos. Instead of using network shares, use the media server to send the videos to mediashare. Select a media server which automatically “transcodes” media (that is, automatically convert to format that mediashare accepts) as it is played. I use Serviio for this purpose, and it works great.

    • 2013/06/10 at 8:46 am | #4

      Thanks for the suggestion. I hadn’t heard of these dynamic encoders before. I’ll have to read about them to see how MediaShare “sees” the software encoder on the network.

  3. 2013/06/12 at 9:47 am | #5

    SomebodySysop :

    Another solution is to install a media server on the PC that holds the videos. Instead of using network shares, use the media server to send the videos to mediashare. Select a media server which automatically “transcodes” media (that is, automatically convert to format that mediashare accepts) as it is played. I use Serviio for this purpose, and it works great.

    Thank you! Serviio is an amazing product on Windows 7. I set it up in a few minutes, added all kinds of avi, mp4 and mp3 files to my library and I was watching them in DirecTV’s MediaShare without transcoding each one into MediaShare’s expected format. It’s amazing and you have saved me so much time and effort! And Serviio supports subtitle files, so I have captions if I want them by simply adding an srt file.

    The only downside of MediaShare is that I cannot advance or rewind the video when played through MediaShare. I wish I could, but I will live through that situation in exchange for not having to transcode each individual file ever again.

  1. 2013/04/25 at 10:42 am | #1

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